Peter singer Jamey Stevens is suing a British-based film company, claiming the company used her image without the permission of her in its marketing campaign for the 2012 film “Escape From Guantanamo Bay,” and that the film company has “excessive potential liability” for violating her privacy

Peter singer Jamey Stevens is suing a British-based film company, claiming the company used her image without the permission of her in its marketing campaign for gospelhitzthe 2012 film “Escape From Guantanamo Bay,” and that the film company has “excessive potential liability” for violating her privacy.

Stevens filed suit late last week (November 30) in the American district court for the District of Maryland against the producers and director, Charlie Wexler and Peter Greste. He alleges that by using her image in the film, Wexler gave the company a license to use her likeness to exploit her in other films and “in all manner and kind of public and commercial performances,” as well as a personal endorsement.

Stevens alleges that she signed an agreement with Wexler in 2012 to create and be part of a creative team to be directedgospelhitz by Greste, while he was the executive producer of “Escape From Guantanamo Bay.” According to her lawsuit, Stevens agreed to have the script by Greste and Wexler written for her and then to be used in production, only to be written out of the story after Wexler was fired in February 2012. She claims that she agreed in writing to that contract to become aware of events that would influence her role in future films.

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“Under the terms of this agreement, Wexler knew that he had created and created to provide a product that would create a product for the United States of America, and that the producers had the right to use any or all of these images,” the suit claims. “These are the facts of this lawsuit which have bee바카라n well documented.”

According to a spokesperson for Disney, Stevens never signed any agreement with the company. But, he told Gizmodo that “if she felt the movie had a value for her to be a part of, and she wanted to be used in future movies, she did the right thing by agreeing to include the image.”

Greste’s attorney, Steven K. Nunn, said that Stevens signed a “permit agreement” with the movie company in 2012 and that, “that didn’t include the right to use anything [her] likeness or not.”

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“That was his interpretation, what they’ve put him in the position of putting us into the role,” Nunn told Gizmodo.

Stevens alleges that, when she discovered the script was being written by another member of the team to be based in Canad